Red Hat

Hibernate Search 5.5.1.Final is now available!

Feedback about our recent 5.5.0.Final release has been great, and while the good news is that nobody reported significant issues, some people also pointed out that the new sorting system was a bit limited.

So we’ve been working on enhancing the FieldBridge API to make sure that those more expert users who implement their own bridging would have a better control on how sorting works as well.

We’ve also started some work to push the performance higher, and overall I’m proud to state that this 5.5.1.Final release is including some small internal polish, but results in measurable improvements.

Sorting & FieldBridge improvements

If you create custom FieldBridge implementations, you can now declare field metadata to benefit from the improved sorting performance.

Since Hibernate Search 5.5, we recommend you explicitly mark which fields will be used for sorting via the @SortableField annotation.

This has an effect on indexing and triggers improved query performance as long as Hibernate Search understands it can use the new more effective sorting strategy.

As kindly reported by Ashot Golovenko, when implementing a custom FieldBridge there was no way to let the Hibernate Search Engine component know which custom created fields are valid to sort on, so even if your implementation was clever enough to index fields appropriately to take advantage of the new sorting capabilities, this wouldn’t be used at query time.

This has been fixed by introducing an extension to FieldBridge: which allows you to configure the metadata correctly. Beware though: this approach is meant for expert users, and the Query engine is going to trust that the metadata you define is actually reflected by what your bridge implementation writes into the index. In case of mismatches, you’ll have runtime exceptions during query time when sorting on a field which wasn’t indexed as declared.

Spot inefficient sorting operations easily in test suites

While Hibernate Search already would log a warning when forced to perform a query using a sub-optimal sorting strategy, that wasn’t making it very easy to spot mapping or usage mistakes.

You can now set this property: = false

and you’ll have your tests fail with a reasonable exception rather than log the warning.

Performance improvements

There are many internal improvements related to performance.

The most interesting one is that now we’ll be able to automatically skip scoring in various index housekeeping operations. This implies you’ll see lower CPU usage on some index write and update operations, and also improved query performance when certain automatic filtering needs to be applied on your queries, such as for narrowing down the entity types, apply sharding related filtering.

The sorting operations have been improved as well: we can now skip the index uninverting process when sorting on distances during spatial queries, or when sorting by scores.

Memory usage has been reduced as well! Special thanks to Andrej Golovnin to have diagnosed and reported HSEARCH-2029, that fix alone will reduce our permanent memory usage.

We also reduced allocation of several short lived but heavy objects being used during indexing and query execution, overall this should improve the efficiency of the JVM.

The performance work is an on-going challenge: I’m quite happy to see very respectable figures, but we’re planning even more improvements, and if you have profiling data or other useful data to share don’t be selfish and share it! Always happy to improve it further.

Components upgrades

Several components were upgraded; most notably we’re now using the latest Apache Lucene version 5.3.1.

  • Upgrade Narayana to 5.2.5.Final

  • Upgrade JGroups to 3.6.6.Final

  • Upgrade Hibernate ORM to 5.0.4.Final

  • Upgrade Apache Lucene to 5.3.1

  • Upgrade to Hibernate Commons Annotations 5.0.1.Final



We’re working on version 5.6, as previously announced it’s going to sport an experimental integration with Elasticsearch.

How to get this release

Everything you need is available on Hibernate Search’s web site. Download the full distribution from here, or get it from Maven Central using the above coordinates, and don’t hesitate to reach us in our forums or mailing lists.

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