Hibernate3 Events

Posted by    |       Hibernate ORM

Another major change in Hibernate3 is the evolution to use an event and listener paradigm as its core processing model. This allows very fine-grained hooks into Hibernate internal processing in response to external, application initiated requests. It even allows customization or complete over-riding of how Hibernate reacts to these requests. It really serves as an expansion of what Hibernate tried to acheive though the earlier Interceptor, Lifecycle, and Validatable interafaces.

Note: The Lifecycle and Validatable interfaces have been moved to the new classic package in Hibernate3. Their use is not encouraged, as it introduces dependencies on the Hibernate library into the users domain model and can be handled by a custom Interceptor or through the new event model external to the domain classes. This is nothing new, as the same recomendation was made in Hibernate2 usage.

So what types of events does the new Hibernate event model define? Essentially all of the methods of the org.hibernate.Session interface correlate to an event. So you have a LoadEvent, a FlushEvent, etc (consult the configuration DTD or the org.hibernate.event package for the full list of defined event types). When a request is made of one of these methods, the Hibernate session generates an appropriate event and passes it to the configured event listener for that type. Out-of-the-box, these listeners implement the same processing in which those methods always resulted. However, the user is free to implement a customization of one of the listener interfaces (i.e., the LoadEvent is processed by the registered implemenation of the LoadEventListener interface), in which case their implementation would be responsible for processing any load() requests made of the Session.

These listeners should be considered effectively singletons; meaning, they are shared between requests, and thus should not save any state as instance variables. The event objects themselves, however, do hold a lot of the context needed for processing as they are unique to each request. Custom event listeners may also make use of the event's context for storage of any needed processing variables. The context is a simple map, but the default listeners don't use the context map at all, so don't worry about over-writing internally required context variables.

A custom listener should implement the appropriate interface for the event it wants to process and/or extend one of the convenience base classes (or even the default event listeners used by Hibernate out-of-the-box as these are declared non-final for this purpose). Custom listeners can either be registered programatically through the Configuration object, or specified in the Hibernate configuration XML (declarative configuration through the properties file is not supported). Here's an example of a custom load event listener:

public class MyLoadListener extends DefaultLoadEventListener {
    // this is the single method defined by the LoadEventListener interface
    public Object onLoad(LoadEvent event, LoadEventListener.LoadType loadType) 
            throws HibernateException {
        if ( !MySecurity.isAuthorized( event.getEntityName(), event.getEntityId() ) ) {
            throw MySecurityException("Unauthorized access");
        return super.onLoad(event, loadType);

Then we need a configuration entry telling Hibernate to use our listener instead of the default listener:

        <listener type="load" class="MyLoadListener"/>

Or we could register it programatically:

Configuration cfg = new Configuration();
cfg.getSessionEventListenerConfig().setLoadEventListener( new MyLoadListener() );

Listeners registered declaratively cannot share instances. If the same class name is used in multiple <listener/> elements, each reference will result in a seperate instance of that class. If you need the capability to share listener instances between listener types you must use the programatic registration approach.

Why implement an interface and define the specific type during configuration? Well, a listener implementation could implement multiple event listener interfaces. Having the type additionally defined during registration makes it easier to turn custom listeners on or off during configuration.

Back to top